Myrtle



(MYRTUS COMMUNIS.) Love.



This flower is always admired in a bouquet from its light and pretty

appearance, and is in nature very fragrant. Cut the petals, five in

number, of double wax, indent the head of a curling pin in each; cut a

fringe at the end of a thin sheet of white wax, having previously folded

a very small piece down to form the anthers. Wind this strip or fringe

round the end of the finest wire, taking care to double the latter

down. Brush these filaments all out, and tip them at the points with my

lemon powder: place the five petals round. The calyx is a row of small

points cut in light green wax; the points are touched with a brush

containing a little brown, and then passed once round the flower. The

stalk is covered with a light green, but partially coloured with brown

also. The buds are made very round, of solid wax, and a calyx affixed to

them like the flower. To make the foliage, look at my instructions.

Commence mounting the flower at the top of a wire; four or six leaves

must be attached first, two and two, then the buds in like order, leaves

under each, and lastly the flowers. About four or six make a pretty

spray.





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